OSTEOARTHRITIS

Known to be the most common type of arthritis, osteoarthritis is thought to affect a staggering 8.75 million people in the UK. Causing the joints to become stiff and painful, the condition can understandably cause a lot of distress, as well as impact quality of life for sufferers.

The main symptoms associated with osteoarthritis include:

  • Stiffness
  • Pain
  • Cracking of the joints
  • Swelling
  • Decreased mobility

These symptoms can vary greatly in severity, with some patients experiencing only mild symptoms intermittently. However, others may experience more severe symptoms on a consistent basis, making it difficult to live a normal lifestyle.

While osteoarthritis can occur in any joint of the body, it does tend to most commonly affect the hips, knees and the hands.

There is a range of biological treatment options available at our Regenext Clinic that avoids the need for invasive surgery and we would be delighted to discuss which would be the most appropriate for you. Please click on the Get in Touch button and our friendly and responsive team will be delighted to chat.

HIP + KNEE

The hip and knee are particularly susceptible to developing osteoarthritis as they are the weight-bearing joints and also often injured through sport or trauma, another risk factor for osteoarthritis.

Hip Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis was largely considered to be a condition you develop as you get older, but a lot of younger people who have been active and who have previously sustained injuries to their joints are also susceptible. While it can impact any joint within the body, the hip, being a weight-bearing joint, is particularly affected.

What causes the condition?

The ball and socket joint of the hips is one of the largest in the body. Its socket is made up by the pelvis bone, the acetabulum, while the ball consists of the upper part of the thighbone, the femoral head. Articular cartilage covers the surfaces of these bones, cushioning and protecting them as they move. A synovium lining coats the surface of the joint, which is responsible for creating the fluid required to lubricate the joint’s cartilage.

Hip osteoarthritis occurs when the cartilage wears away. As it does so, the joint space decreases and the cartilage becomes frayed and rough. It begins to rub against the bone, and in order to compensate for the decrease in cartilage, the bones can also start to grow outwards, creating bone spurs. The naturally occurring joint fluid which usually acts as a lubricant is also lost.

There is no specific cause for the condition, but there are some risk factors identified. These include:

  • Increasing Age
  • Previous injury to the joint
  • Family history
  • Developmental dysplasia – developmental problems of the hip joint since birth
  • Obesity

It’s worth noting that even if these risk factors don’t apply to you, there is still a chance you could develop hip osteoarthritis.

Hip arthritis symptoms to watch out for

Like all forms of osteoarthritis, the main symptoms associated with the condition are stiffness and pain. These will typically worsen over time and can eventually make it difficult for you to carry out normal activities.

The pain will usually reside within and around the hip joint and it’s common for it to feel worse during the morning, or after you’ve been sitting for long periods of time. As the condition worsens, you may start to notice the pain worsening at other times of day, such as in the evening.

There are a few additional symptoms you may experience, including:

  • Sticking or catching of the joint
  • Pain moving or radiating down to the knees
  • Decreased movement within the hip

Due to the fact that the symptoms do tend to get worse over time, it’s imperative to seek treatment as soon as possible. There isn’t a cure for hip osteoarthritis, but there are a lot of orthobiological treatments available to help manage the condition so you can resume a normal life whilst avoiding or delaying major surgery.

Knee Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis of the knee is a very common condition. Causing inflammation and stiffness within the joint. Patients suffering from the condition find it difficult to carry out a lot of daily activities, such as walking, climbing stairs and generally bending and moving the knees.

How does knee arthritis occur?

The knee joint is formed by the bottom end of the thighbone, the kneecap and the shinbone. These three bones are protected by a slippery and smooth articular cartilage covering, which helps to cushion them as you straighten and bend the knee.

It’s known to be the strongest, as well as one of the largest joint in the body. Like other joints in the body, it also contains a synovial lining, which is a includes the fluid responsible for lubricating and reducing friction within the cartilage.

Knee arthritis occurs when the cartilage wears away. When this happens, the bones of the joint can start to rub against each other, causing bone spurs to develop. It tends to generally affect people over the age of 50 or 60, though it can occur earlier in some cases.

There is no specific cause for the condition, but there are some risk factors identified. These include:

  • Increasing Age
  • Previous injury to the joint
  • Family history
  • Previous cartilage surgery to the knee
  • Obesity
  • Unstable knee due to long-standing ligament damage

Due to the fact that the symptoms do tend to get worse over time, it’s imperative to seek treatment as soon as possible. There isn’t a cure for hip osteoarthritis, but there are a lot of orthobiological treatments available to help manage the condition so you can resume a normal life whilst avoiding or delaying major surgery.

ANKLE + FOOT

In some cases, osteoarthritis can occur within the ankle joint and the small joints of the feet. This is caused when the cartilage of the ankle wears away, the condition leads to pain and stiffness within the ankle and foot.

Ankle Osteoarthritis

A tell-tale sign of ankle osteoarthritis is if you hear a popping sound when you flex or point the toes. This indicates that the cartilage isn’t protecting the bones due to it being worn down.

Signs and symptoms of ankle arthritis

Pain is one of the main symptoms of ankle arthritis. It is often felt in the middle, the rear of the foot and the lower shin. At first, the pain tends to only occur after patients have carried out certain activities, such as exercising. However, as it progresses, the pain may become more frequent, either coming and going or flaring up at specific times of the day.

The foot and ankle will also become a lot less flexible, limiting the range of motion within the ankle. You may find it difficult to flex or point your toes, and the stiffness may worsen after a period of activity. Like other types of osteoarthritis, the pain and stiffness will often feel worse during the morning, or after you’ve been sitting for a long period of time.

As the condition worsens, the cartilage within the ankle can begin to wear away unevenly. In order to compensate for this, the joint and bone material may start to shift, changing the way the patient walks. Over time, this can lead to osteoarthritis in the hips and knees as well.

If ankle arthritis isn’t treated, it has the potential to worsen and impact a patient’s mobility. Seeking early treatment, therefore, is important to help slow down the progression of the condition and to aid patients to lead a normal lifestyle.  Our biological therapy options can help you in this regard.

CONTACT + LOCATIONS

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REGENEXT CLINIC

64 Harley Street
Marylebone
London
W1G 7HB